Thursday, August 29, 2013

Damned if you do

Here are some links of interest re: the current situation in Syria. As you may know, chemical weapons appear to have been used; it appears to have been regime forces who used them (though this is not as clear as perhaps it ought to be); and the US and other nations appear to be moving toward a decision to launch punitive strikes on Damascus.

This is an awful situation for Syria to be in. It's an awful situation for concerned/interested nations to be in. Over the last two years, it seems like we've all been saying, "isn't there anything we can do?" Or even, "DO something!" But strikes launched by outside powers? Oh what a gray area that is.

So, links.

Syrians in the UAE are worried about their families back home.

UAE Syrians are divided on their opinions toward a strike conducted by outside nations.

Syria Syrians are also divided on their opinions toward a strike conducted by outside nations.

This article pretty much sums up how horribly divisive this issue is, even for non-Syrians.

As for the US, our diplomatic history with Syria is...interesting.

I also feel there is an element of




in all this.

Feel free to vent your thoughts, opinions, confusions, complete and utter disbelief that it is coming to this, etc. Or try to stop thinking about it. That's what I do. A lot.

11 comments:

Liz Johnson said...

I have absolutely no idea how to respond to this intelligently, except to say... ugh. I don't know. I think the whole thing is horrible. I don't understand how it's ok to kill people with bombs/guns/etc. but not chemical weapons (touche, Eric Snider). I generally oppose violence in all forms, but I don't know what you do when somebody won't stop killing his own people. Generally I vote for a stern lecture and appeal to humanity, but I'm guessing that hasn't exactly worked. I have no idea. My education and experience in this arena is that, at this point, there are no good options - only bad options with heavy risks on all sides.

Sarah Familia said...

I am with Eric. And yet . . . what to do? The maddening thing is that it has felt the same, pretty much from the beginning--like an awful thing happening in slow motion about which no one can do anything.

Sarah Familia said...

I am with Eric. And yet . . . what to do? The maddening thing is that it has felt the same, pretty much from the beginning--like an awful thing happening in slow motion about which no one can do anything.

Hannah said...

I'm on pins and needles waiting to see what happens. While I think that the use of chemical weapons somewhat raises the stakes, I do pretty much agree with Eric. For that reason, I've been wishing that someone would do something for quite some time. Of course, knowing what to do, and intervening in a way that is constructive rather than destructive, is a very difficult matter.

A good part of the time, I try hard not to think about it. In a way, I feel like I'm letting the people I knew over there down by not doing anything, but I just don't know what to do. I can't even write letters to our politicians because I don't even know what I would recommend at this point.

Bridget said...

Agreed, with all of you. There is no right answer.

Suzanne Bubnash said...

Only bad options . . . yeah.

When NATO went into Bosnia somehow the bombing was effective and the war eventually ended. However, there were major differences between that conflict and this one in Syria, namely that the Bosnian war was more easily defined between countries/ethnic groups/religions, so that eventually a treaty was signed between countries to end the war. But where I'm going with this is: during that time refugees were temporarily brought to the US to get them to safety (over 100,000 people were still killed). A family in my ward had some Bosnians living w/ them. I would take in some Syrians. I don't know why this isn't being considered.

Sarah Familia said...

There is this: http://thecable.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/08/08/exclusive_us_will_now_let_in_thousands_of_syrian_refugees. But it's just a drop in the bucket.

Also, sorry for the double posting earlier, Bridget.

Suzanne Bubnash said...

Thanks Sarah, I've seen zero about this in the mainstream press.

And re: Eric Snider--why is it ok to kill thousands, but only in the "traditional" way?

Crys said...

Suzanne I think it was just poor taste sarcasm :-/. I read this thing in the onion that seriously just hit the nail on the head, thanks for being just crazy enough that we don't know what to do. There is zero easy answers here. Obviously he needs to be gone, but that was the truth two years ago as well and the truth is that the vacuum his leaving will leave, well it could be filled by someone really horrible who serves our interest, someone horrible who doesn't, someone ok who doesn't, or someone ok who does or you could just continue in civil war or chaos. It is just horrible all around. But if you want to get really angry watch Fox News....because seriously they act like there is some easy obvious choice that a president of their choosing could come to :-/. My personal opinion is one would be better off watching no news then having Fox News as their only news source...and if your wondering why I was watching...it is constantly on at my gym...thanks Midwest :-/

Suzanne Bubnash said...

Oh, I get Eric Snider Crys. It just seems absurd that the world has not reacted much to the Syrian crisis that has been going on for 18 months. Then all of a sudden chemical weapons show up, and that's what it has taken to draw major attention to the situation, when it did not just now become horrible, it has been so for some time.

And yeah, as bad as Assad is, his regime kept Syria stable. And religious tolerance has been a given. Chances are tiny that it would exist under Assad's replacement.

Crys said...

Agreed. When I look at the Middle East now I think man what a true blessing it is and an amazing piece of foresight our founding father had to separate church and state.

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